PROGRAMS

P.O.I The Psychology of Incarceration

 

The program and books use a deeply original holistic approach to explore root behavioral issues that can influence a person’s incarceration experiences. Even more, P.O.I. offers practical application of the material. This special section is devoted to advances in and developing news on The Psychology of Incarceration. We’ll continue to explore P.O.I.’s success as it, too, gains notoriety in classrooms, community, and incarceration facilities.

 

History

 

A small group of formerly incarcerated individuals reflected on courses or programs they participated in during their incarceration. A college professor joined the discussion. While many of these courses were very successful, these individuals recognized a need and desire for a different course/program. Their new vision morphed into a collaboration to create the program, The Psychology of Incarceration.

Dr. Robin Herman, a specialist in criminology and professor at Wright State University, Khalil Osiris and Tony Villa, Sr., co-wrote the seminal, accompanying textbook and journeybook (for writing) called The Psychology of Incarceration: A Distortion of the State of Belonging (Hanbleceya House, Inc., 2004); Herman also wrote Hanbleceya Quest for Vision: The Stage of Belonging (2000). The program and books use a deeply original holistic approach to explore root behavioral issues that can influence a person’s incarceration experiences. Even more, P.O.I. offers practical application of the material the students learn. Students/inmates that successfully complete the program become certified as a mentor to both incarcerated peers and, upon their release, to other previously-incarcerated individuals.

 

Concepts in the course/program,
The Psychology of Incarceration

 

Criminogenic Needs Domains

What Are They?

Editor’s Note: Read Khalil Osiris’ column, “Presence,” posted in June, 2008, where, in an interview, he discusses some of the Criminogenic Needs Domains. And read Brandi Coleman’s and John Harvey’s powerful essays on how the Needs Domains played a crucial role in their transformation as inmates in Ohio prisons.

In the teaching of The Psychology of Incarceration, the factors called “Criminogenic Needs Domains” occupy and stand for an extremely important part of an individual’s movement toward transformation. They must be fully understood and realized if the incarcerated or formerly incarcerated individual desires to move further in his or her desire to embrace transformation.

Criminogenic Needs  Domains represent an “external locus of control.”  These predictive factors may influence incarcerated or formerly incarcerated individuals’ behavior, values, and attitudes, and they have been shown to be associated with future recidivism.

There are seven dynamic domains:

Employment & Education – This domain looks at the value placed on work and the role of work in the offender’s life; it includes education and vocational skills.

Marital & Family Relations – This domain looks at the value place in being with family members and the support an offender derives from them.

• Association and Social Interaction – This domain looks at the value placed on non-criminal associates and the opportunity for very positive interaction, especially with pro-active and goal-oriented individuals and issues.

Substance Abuse – This domain looks at the value placed on living without the reliance on alcohol and/or drugs.

Community Functioning – This domain looks at the value placed on having the knowledge and necessary skills for daily living. It includes acceptable residence, health, personal budgeting, leisure activities, and the use of social services.

Personal & Emotional Orientation – This domain looks at the value placed on being in control of one’s life. It includes decision-making, coping with stress, and mental health.

Attitude – This domain looks at the value placed on living in law-abiding ways.

 


Transformational Needs Domains

What Are They?

Editor’s Note:  Read John Harvey’s essays to get an inmate’s unique insight into how both the Criminogenic and Transformational Needs Domains have played a role in his life. Mr. Harvey, an inmate at Richland Correctional Institution in Mansfield, Ohio is a 2007 graduate of the course, The Psychology of Incarceration. Also see Brandi Coleman's response to Criminogenic Needs Domains.

Like the “Criminogenic Needs Domains” taught in The Psychology of Incarceration course, the “Transformational Needs Domains” are extremely important in an individual’s successful transformation. The Transformational Needs Domains represent an “internal locus of control.” This internal locus of control is evidenced by cognitive, emotional, and behavioral ownership among incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals, which is essential for successful reentry and recovery.

There are five dynamic domains:

• Faith – This transformational domain looks at the value placed on looking beyond circumstances and challenges at the moment.

• Forgiveness – This domain looks at the value placed on acknowledging and letting go of resentments and historic pain by untying oneself from these experiences.

• Love – This domain looks at the value placed on caring for oneself and others unconditionally.

• Peace – This domain looks at the value placed on being connected to one’s past, present, and future.

• Trust – This dynamic domain looks at the value placed on inner strength.

P.O.I. Textbook

The Psychology of Incarceration: A Distortion of the State of Belonging

 

 

 

 

 

Read reviews of the POI textbook.

For more information on the textbook, The Psychology of Incarceration: A Distortion of the State of Belonging or the journey book, Hanbleceya Quest for Vision, write to:

Robin Herman, Hanbleceya House, Inc.
2971 Kemp Rd.
Beavercreek, Ohio 45431